Info for International Students

What is an international student?
UBC defines an international student as a student who is neither a Canadian citizen nor a permanent resident of Canada.

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Will BCS (ICS) consider my application if I'm an international student?
Absolutely! If you meet the admission requirements for UBC as well as for BCS (ICS), then your application will be given full consideration.

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What are BCS (ICS) tuition costs for international students?
All BCS (ICS) students pay regular tuition fees for the program. Since international students at UBC are charged substantially more per credit than Canadian citizens or permanent residents, the overall cost of the program will be greater for international students.

The BCS (ICS) program requires a minimum of 63 credits for graduation (i.e. 21 courses, although some courses are worth 4 credits each; so this can bring the total to 70 credits, if you do not have any course exemptions). Please refer to the following link for more information: Undergraduate Tuition Fees, the BCS program is under the Faculty of Science.

If you're interested in converting the cost of the program to your home currency, a good currency exchange rate site can also be found at: https://www.x-rates.com/calculator/. Your bank may charge you slightly more than the current rate listed.

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Can I reduce my tuition costs by living in Canada for a number of months in order to be classified as a permanent resident?
Becoming a permanent resident of Canada is not based on length of residency. Rather, it requires a formal application to Citizenship and Immigration Canada. It is a difficult and costly process, with eligibility largely based on your previous education and work experience. Even if you are eligible, it will likely take between 12 and 18 months for your application to be processed and approved. Thus, you should not count on reducing your tuition costs in this manner.

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Will I be eligible for financial aid at UBC?
This is a complex issue, please refer to the International Student Guide, or contact an international advisor at: isa@students.ubc.ca or by phone at: 604-822-5021.

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What else should I know if I want to participate in the program?
You will have to obtain a student visa from Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC). This is relatively straightforward once you have been accepted into the program and the university. You will be asked, however, to provide proof that you can pay your tuition costs and living expenses for the first year of the program, and you may be required to undergo a medical examination. Visit the CIC website for a full list of requirements and an application form.

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Will I have any difficulties working on co-op in Canada since I'm not a Canadian citizen?
No. All foreign students who have student visas and who are participating in co-op can apply for a work permit. You should apply for the work permit at the beginning of Academic Term III.

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Are co-op fees more expensive for international students?
No. Co-op fees are currently the same for both Canadian citizens/permanent residents and international students (see Program, Course, and Faculty Fees section in UBC Calendar).

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Could I do my co-op terms in my home country?
This is a possibility, but would have to be discussed with and approved by your co-op coordinator.

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Where can I get more information about being an international student?
Please refer to the International Student Guide, or contact an international advisor at: isa@students.ubc.ca or by phone at: 604-822-5021.

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BUCS/BTM Combined Business/CS Degrees

 

Elaine Chang
Elaine Chang has a passion for learning, growing from different experiences to another, and she’s equally excited about sharing what she knows with others. These traits make her uniquely suited to her work as a Senior Program Manager at Microsoft, where she combines her love of technology with business applications to help create cutting-edge software products. Wearing multiple hats in this role, Elaine works with diverse groups, displaying a great deal of flexibility and willingness to adapt.
Minutes from her computer science lab, Leigh-Anne Mathieson takes a research break at UBC's treetop walkway
Part 6 of the “Made on Haida Gwaii” Series by April Diamond Dutheil. “Big complex problems don’t scare me anymore, they’re exciting,” tells computer scientist Leigh-Anne Mathieson.
Andy Warfield
UBC Assistant Professor of Computer Science Andy Warfield has won awards that range from the UBC Terrific TA Award to an Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Studentship, a Cambridge Commonwealth Scholarship, and most recently, the prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship. He laughs outright, though, at the suggestion that somehow he was destined from a young age to academic greatness. “Oh no, I was pretty disorganized as a high school student. When I applied to colleges it was under a kind of ‘total chance and random decision’ method.‘”
Anoop Shankar
In her popular book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck describes her notion of two basic states of mind that inform how we learn and succeed. The first is the “fixed mindset,” where a person might believe himself to possess genetically immutable traits. Such a person might think, for example, that he is a strong athlete, or is bad in math, or good with people. The second is the “growth mindset,” where someone believes she can work to develop traits, strengthening areas of ability and making improvements in weaker areas.
Amy Kwok
When you ask Amy Kwok about the kinds of hobbies she enjoys, she pauses to gather her thoughts and then launches into a list of favourites: “I like to play the piano and guitar and to paint, I try to travel, I love playing badminton, I really like hiking, and I like to do the Grouse Grind with friends—slowly!” Such a mix of the active and more reflective, the artistic and the sporting, the solo adventure and the group activity are pretty illustrative of Amy’s diverse talents and they showcase her love of learning in numerous settings.