Alumni/Industry Lecture: Gail Murphy - Implications of Open Source Software Use

Date: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 | 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Location: 
ACL, 14th Floor, 980 Howe St. Vancouver BC
Date: Wed., Sept 21, 2016
Time: Networking starts at 6 pm, talk will begin at 6:30 pm.
RSVP: Please rsvp below.
Title: Implications of Open Source Software Use
Speaker: Professor Gail Murphy, Professor of Computer Science and Associate Vice President Research and International pro tem at UBC,   co-founder and Chief Scientist at Tasktop Technologies.
Abstract:
Everyone wants to build software faster and cheaper. The use of Open source frameworks, libraries and components is often seen as a way to achieve those goals. But does open source really help towards those goals? Is the software really free or are there hidden costs? Are there responsibilities that one assumes when using the software? When is it reasonable to rely on open source software? In this talk, I will describe the results of large scale mining studies of open source projects, interviews with senior engineering leaders and a survey of open source developers investigating such issues as whether developers really understand the open source licenses associated with software upon which they rely.
Bio:
Gail C. Murphy is a Professor of Computer Science and Associate Vice President Research and International pro tem at UBC.  She is also co-founder and Chief Scientist at Tasktop Technologies. Her research interests are in improving the productivity of software developers and knowledge workers by giving them tools to identify, manage and coordinate the information that really matters for their work.
A big thank you to ACL for hosting the event.

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