CS Theses & Dissertations 1990

For 1990 graduation dates (in alphabetical order by last name):

Constraint Satisfaction for Interactive 3-D Model Acquisition
Cameron, Heather
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/28937
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11
Supervisor : Dr. Lowe

Implementing a Normative Theory of Communication in a Framework for Default
Csinger, Andrew
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/28954
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-05
Supervisor : Dr. Poole

Application of the Ferry Clip Approach to Multi-Party and Interoperability Testing
Dany, Hendra
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/28971
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11

Dynamic Bayesian Networks
Horsch, Michael
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/28909
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11

An Access Control Model Based on Time and Events
Jaggi, Felix
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/28945
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11

Performance Monitoring in Transputer-based Multicomputer Networks
Jiang, Jie Cheng
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/28968
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11

Protocol Test Sequence Generation and Analysis Using AI Techniques
Ko, Kai-Chung
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/29192
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11

The Generation of Phrase-Structure Representations from Principles
Leblanc, David
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/29338
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11
Supervisor : Dr. Rosenberg

Open Systems Interconnection Passive Monitor OSI-PM
Lo, Kin Hung Jeffrey
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/29418
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11

Semi-Automatic Protocol Implementation Using an Estelle-C Compiler, Lapb and RTS Protocols as Examples
Lu, Jing
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/29419
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11
Supervisor : Dr. Little

A Theory of Multiscale Curvature- and Torsion- Based Shape Representation for Planar and Space Curves
Mokhtarian, Farzin
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/30740
Degree : Doctor of Philosophy – PhD
Graduation Date : 1990-11
Supervisor : Dr. Mackworth

This thesis presents a theory of multi-scale, curvature and torsion based shape representation for planar and space curves. The theory presented has been developed to satisfy various criteria considered useful for evaluating shape representation methods in computer vision. The criteria are: invariance, uniqueness, stability, efficiency, ease of implementation and computation of shape properties. The regular representation for planar curves is referred to as the curvature scale space image and the regular representation for space curves is referred to as the torsion scale space image. Two variants of the regular representations, referred to as the renormalized and resampled curvature and torsion scale space images, have also been proposed. A number of experiments have been carried out on the representations which show that they are very stable under severe noise conditions and very useful for tasks which call for recognition of a noisy curve of arbitrary shape at an arbitrary scale or orientation. Planar or space curves are described at varying levels of detail by convolving their parametric representations with Gaussian functions of varying standard deviations. The curvature or torsion of each such curve is then computed using mathematical equations which express curvature and torsion in terms of the convolutions of derivatives of Gaussian functions and parametric representations of the input curves. Curvature or torsion zero-crossing points of those curves are then located and combined to form one of the representations mentioned above. The process of describing a curve at increasing levels of abstraction is referred to as the evolution or arc length evolution of that curve. This thesis contains a number of theorems about evolution and arc length evolution of planar and space curves along with their proofs. Some of these theorems demonstrate that evolution and arc length evolution do not change the physical interpretation of curves as object boundaries and others are in fact statements on the global properties of planar and space curves during evolution and arc length evolution and their representations. Other theoretical results shed light on the local behavior of planar and space curves just before and just after the formation of a cusp point during evolution and arc length evolution. Together these results provide a sound theoretical foundation for the representation methods proposed in this thesis.

Automating the Generation of Interactive Applications
Noik, Emanuel G.
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/29690
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11
Supervisor : Dr. Lowe

Application of shape-from-shading to synthetic aperture radar
Pope, Glenn William
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/29755
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-05
Supervisor : Dr. Woodham

Parallel Techniques for Construction of Trees and related problems
Przytycka, Teresa
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/30640
Degree : Doctor of Philosophy – PhD
Graduation Date : 1990-11
Supervisor : Dr. Kirkpatrick

The concept of a tree has been used in various areas of mathematics for over a century. In particular, trees appear to be one of the most fundamental notions in computer science. Sequential algorithms for trees are generally well studied. Unfortunately many of these sequential algorithms use methods which seem to be inherently sequential. One of the contributions of this thesis is the introduction of several parallel techniques for the construction of various types of trees and the presentation of new parallel tree construction algorithms using these methods. Along with the parallel tree construction techniques presented here, we develop techniques which have broader applications. We use the Parallel Random Access Machine as our model of computation. We consider two basic methods of constructing trees:tree expansion and tree synthesis. In the tree expansion method, we start with a single vertex and construct a tree by adding nodes of degree one and/or by subdividing edges. We use the parallel tree expansion technique to construct the tree representation for graphs in the family of graphs known as cographs. In the tree synthesis method, we start with a forest of single node subtrees and construct a tree by adding edges or (for rooted trees) by creating parent nodes for some roots of the trees in the forest. We present a family of parallel and sequential algorithms to construct various approximations to the Huffman tree. All these algorithms apply the tree synthesis method by constructing a tree in a level-by-level fashion. To support one of the algorithms in the family we develop a technique which we call the cascading sampling technique. One might suspect that the parallel tree synthesis method can be applied only to trees of polylogarithmic height, but this is not the case.We present a technique which we call the valley filling technique and develop its accelerated version called the accelerated valley filling technique. We present an application of this technique to an optimal parallel algorithm for construction of minimax trees.

Explanations in Hybrid Expert Systems
Scott, Lawrence Gill
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/28741
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-05

Markov Random Fields in Visual Reconstruction:  A Transputer-Based Multicomputer Implementation
Siksik, Ola
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/28863
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11
Supervisor : Dr. Little

A New Methodology for OSI Conformance Testing Based on Trace Analysis
Wvong, Russil
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/29343
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11
Supervisor : Dr. Neufeld

An Organizatonal Communication Protocol Based on Speech Acts:  Design, Verification and Formal Specifications
Zeng, Tao
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/29410
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1990-11



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