CS Theses & Dissertations 1979

For 1979 graduation dates (in alphabetical order by last name):

Towards a New Animation Technology
Barenholtz, Jerome
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/21488
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1979-05

A Performance Experiment on a UNIX System
Downing, Roderick Lane
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/21364
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1979-11

Design of an Intelligent LISP CAI Tutor
Fine, Gary
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/21357
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1979-11

Anaphora in Natural Language Understanding: A Survey
Hirst, Graeme
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1979-11

Language and Computer Design for Effective Software Systems
Lillich, Alan W.
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/21399
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1979-11

Representation and Control in a Program that Understands Line Sketches of Houses
Mulder, Jan A.
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/21427
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1979-05

LOGO:  An Approach to Computer-Based Learning
Pollack, Kimberly Anne Armstrong
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/21436
Degree : Master of Science – MSc
Graduation Date : 1979-05

Representing Spatial Experience and Solving Spatial Problems in a Simulated Robot Environment
Rowat, Peter Forbes
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/2429/22058
Degree : Doctor of Philosophy – PhD
Graduation Date : 1979-11

This thesis is concerned with spatial aspects of perception and action in a simple robot. To this end, the problem of designing a robot-controller for a robot in a simulated robot-environment system is considered. The environment is a two-dimensional tabletop with movable polygonal shapes on it. The robot has an eye which 'saes' an area of the tabletop centred on itself, with a resolution which decreases from the centre to the periphery. Algorithms are presented for simulating the motion and collision of two dimensional shapes in this environment. These algorithms use representations of shape both as a sequence, of boundary points and as a region in a digital image. A method is outlined for constructing and updating the world model of the robot as new visual input is received from the eye. It is proposed that, in the world model, the spatial problems of path-finding and object-moving be based on algorithms that find the skeleton of the shape of empty space and of the shape of the moved object. A new iterative algorithm for finding the skeleton, with the property that the skeleton of a connected shape is connected, is presented. This is applied to path-finding and simple object-moving problems. Finally, directions for future work, are outlined.



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