alumni profile

Mehryar Maalam
Watch this video about a CS alum now working at IBM.
Mik Kersten
UBC Computer Science alumnus Mik Kersten has received an investment injection of $100 million from Sumeru Equity Partners for his ultra-successful spinoff company, Tasktop. He shares his journey... “I was ten when we escaped from Poland and moved to Ottawa. I graduated from high school there, then hopped on my motorcycle to drive out to British Columbia to start my anthropology degree at UBC,” Kersten said. He quickly became entranced with anthropology and evolution. “The theme of my cohort was ‘nature versus nurture.’ Through that, I came to realize how we are evolving and thinking, and that
Ghislaine Chan
As Vice President of Software Engineering at Broadridge Financial, UBC CS Alumna Ghislaine Chan’s days are very full. And that seems to be right up her alley. Ghislaine has long been passionate about contributing in meaningful ways, which is evident with a glance at her robust education and work history. Since she graduated from UBC Computer Science (CS) in 2000, Ghislaine has been steadily building her career at Broadridge Financial, a global Fintech leader. Her success story is not atypical for UBC Computer Science alumni. Most land well. “I’ve always loved science and math,” said Ghislaine
Elaine Chang
Elaine Chang has a passion for learning, growing from different experiences to another, and she’s equally excited about sharing what she knows with others. These traits make her uniquely suited to her work as a Senior Program Manager at Microsoft, where she combines her love of technology with business applications to help create cutting-edge software products. Wearing multiple hats in this role, Elaine works with diverse groups, displaying a great deal of flexibility and willingness to adapt.
Anoop Shankar
In her popular book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck describes her notion of two basic states of mind that inform how we learn and succeed. The first is the “fixed mindset,” where a person might believe himself to possess genetically immutable traits. Such a person might think, for example, that he is a strong athlete, or is bad in math, or good with people. The second is the “growth mindset,” where someone believes she can work to develop traits, strengthening areas of ability and making improvements in weaker areas.
Like so many UBC Computer Science BCS graduates, Tristan Moss has a C.V. worth the envy of many far older than he: an undergraduate degree from the University of Victoria, a Bachelor of Computer Science from UBC, software development positions with Kodak, Microsoft, and iQmetrix, and an extensive portfolio of volunteer community service throughout the world. Despite these accomplishments, he is modest and self-effacing, and as an example points out that he was a mediocre student who initially had difficulties studying at UVic. Hanging out with his girlfriend (and now wife) Jodi helped him see
A hugely popular form of entertainment, video gaming is currently a nearly $50 billion worldwide industry that experts predict will overtake the music industry in sales by the end of 2011. This is true in no small part because gaming, contrary to popular belief, is something we all seem to do.
When you ask Frank Hangler about his interests, you see him pause for a moment, as if wondering where in the world—literally—he should begin. When he does, he launches into an array of subjects, each one ripe for discussion: world history, music, Canadian health policy, cooking, the relationship between social media and social movements, European travel, web design, dot-com startups, architecture, wine, backpacking,—is there not a topic on which he’s at least conversant, and quite likely very knowledgeable?