Richard Rosenberg

Professor Emeritus
Email: rosen [at] cs [dot] ubc [dot] ca
Office: ICCS 189
Phone: 604-827-3133

Retired as of December 31, 2004

Curriculum Vitae

B.A. Sc. Engineering Physics, University of Toronto (1961); M. A.Sc. Electrical Engineering, University of Toronto (1964); Ph.D. Communication Sciences, University of Michigan (1967); Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Michigan (1967- 1968); Assistant Professor, University of British Columbia (1968- 1976); Associate Professor, University of British Columbia (1976 - 1998); Director, Division of Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, and Computer Science, Dalhousie University (1984-1986); Professor, University of British Columbia (1998 - ).

Keywords

artificial intelligence
educational technologies
educational technologies
semantics
syntactics
natural language interfaces
medicine
free speech
privacy
social issues in computing
professional standards
ethics

Interests

In spite of extravagant claims by its proponents that the Internet is a revolutionary technology with profound implications for all aspects of society, it is becoming increasingly clear that its emergence is a mixed blessing. It has been my concern to identify and explicate a number of issues associated with the astonishing pervasiveness of the Internet. More specifically, such issues as privacy and anonymity, free speech, access, and ethics and professionalism, have been at the forefront of my research efforts. The focus of my research has been two fold, namely, developments of national and international privacy policies, particularly with respect to electronic media, in Canada, the United States, and Europe as well as national and international approaches to the regulation of free speech on the Internet.

These issues often create ethical dilemmas for computer scientists and therefore I am involved in both developing methodologies for teaching ethics and professional standards to computer science students and in exploring approaches to dealing with these dilemmas as they arise in the workplace, educational institutions, and at home.

The work on database interfaces seeks to extend the ways in which information in the database can be used to aid natural language interfaces (NLI) in mapping from a natural language question into a formal database query. Some work has been done on dealing with a small class of semantic ambiguities by comparing the paths between relations in the relational database. Other kinds of information already available in the database could be exploited to provide other means for dealing with semantic ambiguities and for extending the class dealt with. More recent applications have involved the mapping of the natural language query into a search engine request for the Web.

Selected Publications

R. S. Rosenberg, "The Workplace on the Verge of the 21st Century". Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 22, No. 1, October 1999, pp. 3- 14.

R. S. Rosenberg, "The Social Impact of Intelligent Artifacts". AI & Society , Vol. 22, 2008, pp. 367-383.

R. S. Rosenberg, "Free Speech, Pornography, Sexual Harassment, and Electronic Networks". The Information Society, October- December 1993, 9(4) pp. 285-331.

Julia A. Johnson and Richard S. Rosenberg, "A Data Management Strategy for Transportable Natural Language Interfaces". International Journal of Intelligent Systems, 10, 1995, pp. 771- 808.

R. S. Rosenberg, "Privacy Protection on the Internet: the Marketplace Versus the State". Wiring the World: The Impact of Information Technology on Society, IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology, Indiana University South Bend, June 12-13, 1998, pp. 138-147. Also available at: http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ntiahome/privacy/files/5com.txt

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